Easy and David reunited

Easy is back with companion David after her visit to the veterinary hospital. She is being treated for an ear infection and also had an examination by the ophthalmologist. Lions are very sociable cats and they were clearly pleased to be reunited. The pair rescued from different circuses in Colombia and Peru were brought together at the ADI Wildlife Sanctuary earlier this year for companionship.

Lupe needs your love

Ex-circus tiger from Guatemala, Lupe, is now suffering the same damage because of her circus life, like her sisters Bimbi and Sombra. She is now having the same seizures we saw in her sisters and was taken to hospital for an MRI so that Dr Caldwell and his colleagues could establish the extent of the lesions on her brain and decide the next course of medication to hold off and minimise the seizures. This condition cannot be cured, but we can treat her to make her comfortable and give her as long as we can to enjoy the freedom of her habitat alongside her family. She is now back home at the ADI Wildlife Sanctuary following her scan.

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Lion loyalty

Tarzan says “No” to food and meds until he sees his Tanya! Recently, Tarzan was unwell. Taking no chances, we took him to hospital. But he was miserable there and refused to eat or take his medication. The solution – bring his Tanya in early for her dental check! The couple were put together in the same hospital room. They were overjoyed to see each other, and Tarzan immediately took his meds, ate his dinner, and went straight to sleep, guarded by his Tanya! 

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Amazonas eye surgery

We reported earlier that Dr Caldwell had identified a serious eye problem for lioness Amazonas – a cataract combined with a collapse of the back of the eye, and she was taken into hospital. The ophthalmologist confirmed Dr Caldwell’s diagnosis and that the eye should be removed. We are all relieved and delighted that the surgery has been a success, our strong lady of the Amazon is recovering well and will be home at the ADI Wildlife Sanctuary soon.

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Amazonas on her way to hospital

Amazonas, beloved aunt of the Cusco pride, is on her way to hospital. There was no need for sedation and she calmly walked into her travel crate. For some time, veterinarian Dr Peter Caldwell has been monitoring her right eye, which has a cataract and the lens has prolapsed to the anterior chamber. For much of the time, the eye has looked normal with occasional flare-ups. It is highly likely the eye will need to be removed. Eye problems begin in the rescued lions as a result of years of malnutrition in the circus. There may also be a genetic component, as the lions with the worst eye problems are likely related. Amazonas’s sister Kiara of Cusco had an eye removed five years ago and Leo had his eye removed last year. Although they are in two separate family groups, the circus owners bred and sold cubs to others and asserted that Leo was father to most of Peru’s circus lions. Kiara of Huarral is definitely Leo’s daughter (as is Africa), and now has a serious cataract in one eye.

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We are rooting for Rey

(Pictured at the ADI Wildlife Sanctuary a few weeks ago).

Rey Ayacucho (or Rey A) will be staying at Old Chapel Veterinary Clinic under the supervision of Dr Peter Caldwell for a while. His condition is potentially serious with a large mass in his chest that is pressing on his lungs. Dr Caldwell has stabilised him and is evaluating different treatments. Rey is comfortable right now, and has a good appetite but can only eat small portions. Much Love to Rey and wishing for him to come home again to be with brother Simba at the ADI Wildlife Sanctuary.

Rey hospital update

Thank you to everyone who has been sending “Get Well” wishes to Rey Ayacucho, who is currently in hospital at the Old Chapel Veterinary Clinic. You will be pleased to know that Rey is looking much brighter and has regained some of his appetite. Lions are so stoic, as in the wild it is not safe to show any weakness, which is a big concern when one of our ADI Wildlife Sanctuary circus survivors starts looking unwell. Rey is under the watchful eye of Dr Peter Caldwell and will be having some tests, so we are all hoping for the best and seeing him back at the Sanctuary soon with his friend and brother Simba.

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Lions get a veterinary checkup

Dr Peter Caldwell has had a busy day at the ADI Wildlife Sanctuary checking our residents. Five lions were sedated for examination and blood/urine samples for testing: ReyA, Leo, Muñeca, Kiara2 and Africa. The most common health issues that our rescued lions face are related to the abuse and deprivation suffered in their former circus life, including: dental problems due to teeth being smashed and left to get infected, eye problems from malnutrition or brain damage from blows to the head and arthritis due to lack of exercise and living on hard, urine-soaked boards. We will often see a significant improvement in cataracts when the lions are put on a healthy diet and the problems can be held at bay for several years, but it does tend to return. ADI rescued all of these lions from circuses in Peru 8 years ago.

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